Saturday, July 29, 2017

Vintage Glassware

I recently attended the 41st annual Collectible Glass Show presented by the Peach State Depression Glass Club in Marietta, GA. There were 28 national dealers who brought vintage glass from the 1880s through the 1970s.


This was the second year I have gone and I thought you might enjoy the sight of so much pretty glassware in one place!


Most of the manufacturers of Depression glass, Elegant glass, and Carnival glass were represented in one booth or another. There were also many examples of mid-century art glass.


The glassware was generally displayed so that you could easily see the entire piece. In several booths items were placed on mirrors to highlight the play of light on the glass.


Don't you just love the colors?


Pastel and clear items dominated, but there were beautiful deep colors too!


And all for sale! You know I couldn't pass up the chance to buy beautiful examples of glass artistry that are also functional.


I loved the pattern of the etching on this Jeannette 'Floragold' pitcher. I think the soft amber color will go with lots of my tableware.


I had not seen the combination of clear and frosted glass that is in this pair of Cambridge 'Caprice Alpine/Moonlight Blue' candle holders before. They are in the same pattern as these sherbet glasses, which have only the clear glass.

Both the pitcher and the candle holders are sure to be highlighted in a tablescape (someday)!

I wish I had more examples to show you, but I was more interested in looking at everything than in taking photos!

Linking to:
Dishing It and Digging It
Amaze Me Monday
Coastal Charm
Metamorphosis Monday
Celebrate and Decorate
The Scoop
Inspire Me Tuesday
Savvy Southern Style
Share Your Style
Katherine's Corner
Between Naps on the Porch



Monday, July 24, 2017

South of the Border

Sometimes you just have to do it!


Without planning, without time to give it much thought, you just have to do it!


Daughter J had a rare Sunday off work and had come to spend the day with us. She and I had planned for us to go out for lunch but G had other ideas.


It was to be lunch at home -- chicken fajitas with a Cuban twist. They cooked while I set the table and snapped photos.


I had twenty minutes to set a table with a south of the border flavor. . .


. . . to go with the dozen sunflowers we had bought the day before.


Stoneware in earthy colors - check!


Colorful linens - check!


Iced tea in palm tree glasses - check! Margarita glasses with blue in the upper stem - check!


Intense, vibrant sunflowers direct from the field - check!


And in the center alongside the sunflowers, I placed a reproduction of a Meso-American chacmool, found in Toltec and Mayan sites, that I bought in Mexico many years ago.


I also included these exquisite hand-crafted salt and pepper mills (previously used here).


Fun and casual? Yes!

 

And it came together in less than 20 minutes with what I had on hand!

Resources
Dinner plates | Bordallo Pinheiro
Salad plates | Pier 1 'Spice Route' (previous post)
Iced tea glasses | Godinger 'Palm'
Flatware | Mikasa 'Italian Countryside'
Napkins | Fiesta
Napkin rings | Silver-plated, antique mall
Chacmool information | Popular Archaeology fall 2015,  "The Mysterious Chacmool" by Victor Zugg

Join me at:
The Scoop
Inspire Me Tuesday
Celebrate Your Story
The Dedicated House
Savvy Southern Style
Share Your Style
Katherine's Corner
Between Naps on the Porch
French Country Cottage
Rattlebridge Farm
Pieced Pastimes
Life on Lakeshore Drive
Sundays at Home
Dishing It and Digging It
Amaze Me Monday
Coastal Charm
Metamorphosis Monday

Thursday, July 13, 2017

A Table for La Fête Nationale


I've been fascinated with French history and culture since I was a teenager. Six years of French language and literature classes turned me into a bit of a Francophile. I horribly mangle French when I speak it, but I used to be able to understand half of what I heard. I was better at reading French, and loved Molière and Rimbaud.


One day I'll make it to France, but in the meantime I thought I'd celebrate July 14th with them by creating a table for la Fête nationale. (Known as Bastille Day by English speakers.)


The French Tricolor flag is bleu, blanc et rouge, which are the colors of the table, with a bit of gold added.


I started with these marvelous salad plates depicting la tour Eiffel, the instantly recognizable emblem of Paris, and by extension, France. I love the line drawing in black and white. What a find at the antique mall!



The tower plates were placed on top of blue dinner plates which have an allover trellis design, evoking the beautiful jardins blooming with flowers throughout the cities and the countryside. These in turn are set on gold chargers whose curves remind me of fine French furniture.


The fleur-de-lis pattern on the flatware is an ancient symbol that was adopted by French royalty in the late Middle Ages. Linen napkins bring a deep navy to the table.



 A bottle of wine, croissants and cheese represent the casual elegance of French cuisine.


I added strawberries for their bright red color, placing them on a hand-crafted wood board. I love the shape it has and the various woods used.


Generous wine glasses allude to the red in the flag. White carnations and lavender, which always makes me think of the south of France, were placed in a ceramic container found on another treasure jaunt.


I wanted a thoughtful table setting for la Fête nationale that subtly reads françoise. I think this succeeded.



And I think it can be used whenever a bit of French flair is wanted!



Thank you for coming to dinner!  

Resources
Salad plates | Mikasa 'Parisian Scenes'
Dinner plates | Block 'Blue Skies'
Bread plates | Hazel-Atlas 'Newport'
Flatware | Oneida 'Juilliard'
Stemware | Marquis by Waterford 'Vintage'
Napkins | Sur La Table


Places to visit
Katherine's Corner
Between Naps on the Porch
French Country Cottage
Rattlebridge Farm
Life on Lakeshore Drive
Love of Home
Dishing It and Digging It
Amaze Me Monday
Metamorphosis Monday
Coastal Charm
The Scoop
Inspire Me Tuesday
Celebrate Your Story
Make It Pretty Monday
Wow Us Wednesdays
Feathering My Empty Nest

Sunday, July 9, 2017

The Changing Garden

June brought new colors and shapes to the front garden.

Japanese iris (Iris ensata) are the last to bloom of the three types of irises I have. You'll notice that both sets of petals are flatter, forming a simpler, broader flower. They're fighting the creeping shade...



...while Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Variegatum') continues to spread happily under the oaks and dogwoods.



I enjoy the impact that flowering shrubs bring. Gardenia jasminoides perfume the area near the front door. I think these are 'August Beauty'.

 


Bees come to visit the magenta Spiraea japonica shrubs. They'll bloom most of the summer now that they're no longer in shade.



White Calla lilies (Zantedeschia aethiopica) have freely self-sown, a little too vigorously! These pink and violet ones are my favorites, so of course they haven't strayed from where I planted them.




The first of the daylilies (Hemerocallis) have joined the party. There are thousands of daylily cultivars; my garden has six, but I've lost track of their varietal names. If only they could be used in flower arrangements, they would be the perfect perennial.





Shasta daisies (Leucanthemum x superbum 'Becky') are melting away where the shade has deepened, but have discovered the area where one of the trees was removed. They will dependably flower until fall if dead-headed regularly.



This spider lily (Hymenocallis sp.), which came with me when we built this house twenty years ago, probably hales from northern South America. It has responded happily to all the rain we've had lately -- currently more than three feet tall, the flowers are beginning to bend from their weight.



Our two Labrador retrievers rule the backyard, enthusiastically removing any flowers I plant. So back there I'm content to stare at the trees.


Staring skyward, I think how gardens are constantly changing. Trees grow tall and cast ever more shade. Droughts take their toll. Longtime favorites fade away, others self-sow. Some perennials creep slowly to a place more to their liking. Native wildflowers find their way in.  All of which makes gardening interesting and challenging!

Thank you for visiting my garden!

Find inspiration at:
Dishing It and Digging It 156
Gardens Galore No. 3
Between Naps on the Porch
Amaze Me Monday-222
Coastal Charm - No. 369
Celebrate Your Story 85
The Scoop #283
Make It Pretty Monday 220
Inspire Me Tuesday
Wow Us Wednesdays #344
Share Your Style 126
Rattlebridge Farm
French Country Cottage
Love of Home
Life on Lakeshore Drive
Finding Silver Pennies
Katherine's Corner